Matt Kelley from Legendary Trainhoppers: Top 10 of 2016

Written by The Point 91fm. Posted in Uncategorized

Matt Kelley plays mandolin in The Legendary Trainhoppers and runs The B-Side at One Lucky Guitar.

Hiss Golden Messenger: Heart Like a Levee. Sometimes music is just right time, right place; this album (and its bonus collection, Vestapol) felt like a harpoon shot into my soul, to staggeringly beautiful results.

The I Don’t Cares: Wild Stab. Paul and Jules, sand-paper and daffodil, as they say (and said). Wild ’n’ wily, Westerberg is sharper than ever here; funny, heartbreaking, snide, out of tune and bled out, yet still believing, still rising. My hero.

Sam Evian, Premium. Started listening because he/they were opening for Teenage Fanclub, got lost in it. Saw them open for Teenage Fanclub (and, prior to that, Whitney), and didn’t just get lost IN it, but rather, I lost it altogether.

Paul Burch, Meridian Rising. I’m in a band; I wouldn’t mind if that band sounded like this. In other words, a concept album about Jimmie Rodgers’ life and death, ramshackle and loose and bawdy and boisterous.

Drive-By Truckers, American Band. Or this. If Joe Strummer were to write an album about America in 2016, it would sound pretty much just like American Band. I know you think you know the DBT’s; go listen again.

Whitney, Light upon the Lake. Pop album of the year; beautiful to just drop the needle on, and go about your day, well, unless you listen a little more closely, that is…

Teenage Fanclub, Here. This album is really terrific—better than Wilco’s, which came out the same day—but the real highlight of the Fannies and me this year was finally getting to see ‘em live, after desiring to do so for 25 years…

The Avett Brothers, True Sadness. Hey now, I, too, started running from Rubin. I ran like hell, I really did. But this album is pure brills. Redemption, despite the tape loops.

Slow Dakota, The Ascension of Slow Dakota. I was talking to PJ Sauerteig about this and he’s like “You’re in a band too?” and I said, “Yeah, we’ve got songs about cars AND girls” and he was like, “Oh. My songs are about existentialism in a post-ironic past-modern society, that come to terms with the bars that keep all of us privately in a struggle against an outside world that’s actually an internal monologue…” PS It’s shockingly enjoyable to listen to, too.

Warpaint, Heads Up. Slinky and atmospheric, out all night, whiskey on an ice cold tongue.

Mike Adams at His Honest Weight, Casino Drone. Tremendous, but if only Mike had picked the best here, and combined it with last year’s unbelievable Preparation Age EP, he’d been top three of the year.

Top 10 Albums of 2016 From Dani House

Written by The Point 91fm. Posted in Uncategorized

Dani House from Microwave Miracles

Dani House from Microwave Miracles

#1

Bedbug – if i got smaller grew wings and flew away

#2

Frankie Cosmos – Next Thing

#3

Tenniscoats – Music Exists Vol. 3

 

4. Andy Shauf – The Party

5. Kalan Ya Heidi – Kemuri

6. bunny boy – Shelly

7. soccer mommy – for young hearts

8. Gorgeous Bully – n.w.o.b.h.m.

9. Brendan Sepe – Songs Over the Telephone

10. Siobhan – St. Pius Session

Catfish and The Bottlemen-The Ride

Written by Staff. Posted in Uncategorized

The Ride: Catfish and the Bottlemen Reviewthe-ride

By: Chase King

The Ride by Catfish and the Bottlemen, the second album being released by the indie alternative band formed in the wales in 2007. The band follows influence most strongly by the Killers, stating in an interview that they were going to cover the Killers because they had already ripped off enough from the band. Not only are there similarities between Brandon Flowers and Van McCann voices and expression in vocals, but the songwriting and instrumentals are fairly closely related. The Rides main single, Sound check, is the albums best relation to mainstream indie rock, as the main chorus doesn’t have much specific unique sound to it, an aspect that doesn’t do the rest of the album justice as the albums highlight is its interesting and very raw instrumentals reinforcing vocals that aren’t focused on hitting incredibly ranged notes but rather giving the message of the song within a very eased and comfortable voice. Overall, while Sound Check is definitely one of my favorite songs from the album, it does seem to be set up for success by the band just due to its more streamlined sound, not something that fans of the band would be hoping would come out of the album. The albums strong suit would have to be the mix of acoustic and electric guitars to establish different moods within the song, and the electric guitars not having a large and high energy tone to ruin the soft sound.

Overall, The Ride by Catfish and the Bottlemen has a lot of good things going for it. The instrumentals work with McCanns voice towards a very chilled out indie sound. The album is definitely worth a listen if you enjoy the music that the station plays.

Devandra Banhart’s Ape in Pink Marble: An Album Review

Written by Staff. Posted in Music, Reviews, Uncategorized

devendra-banhart-ape-in-pink-marble-1000sq_1_3

By: Jack Persinger  

Have you ever taken a really great walk on a beach? Maybe it was the rolling waves of the Pacific in California, or the shores of a lake. Well let me tell you, this is one beach walk of an album from Venezuelan-American indie artist Devandra Banhart, and I mean that in quite a good way. Coming into this album, this was not a genre I dabbled in too much, but honestly these few listens of Ape in Pink Marble may have changed that. Banhart’s ninth studio album doesn’t see too much of a departure from the light, airy sound he established in his last outing, 2013’s Mala, but don’t think for a second that they are the same; Ape focuses on much darker themes, like those of death, longing, and sadness.  Devandra’s 2016 release is adorned with his own artwork on the cover, an intriguing sketch of blue coloration. From the get-go, single and opening track “Middle Names” sets up the somber mood of the majority of the tracks that follow it, detailing Banhart’s longing and missing of a friend who has passed. His vocals are soft and immediate, establishing a close connection with the listener as his guitar sweeps along the track like the wind through a seashell. His playing is soft and minimalistic, but also captivating, with chords played with just enough energy to carry the soft mood of the album. But Devandra knows how to balance his instrumentals within the album, taking a backseat on the guitar when he needs to let other sounds take over, like the soaring synths found in the calm and collected “Jon Lends a Hand.” But an album full of mellow indie folk beach jams would get a little repetitive, and Banhart addresses this with two humorous, entertaining, and vital tracks to Ape: Spunky and cocky “Fancy Man” paints Devandra as a classy individual with high expectations and details this personality in a highly entertaining manner, while disco-ready “Fig in Leather” sees Banhart speak a humorous monologue over a catchy bassline and synth melody that will grab you by the collar immediately. While these two tracks stand out and add diversity to the album, they tend to be a black sheep for the album, not fitting in to the majority of Banhart’s tracks and adding to the incoherence of the middle of this 2016 release. But the second part of this album returns to the sound established in the first half of it, introducing lo-fi intrigue with “Saturday Night.” My favorite moment in the whole album comes in “Linda,” where 2 and a half minutes in Devandra slows his playing down to a single chord played over silence, increasingly slowing down to the chord being played at near-20 second intervals, adding to the mysterious and light mood of the song. Overall, this is an album I can see myself coming back to another day, as Banhart’s soothing voice and airy sound culminates in a truly fantastic indie folk album.

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